SBDC Programs to Help Your Small Business

 
08/18/2017

Click for today's EXTRABy Sarah Field

The government is full of acronyms, and sometimes it’s difficult to know which ones are most applicable and relevant to your business. One acronym you definitely want to familiarize yourself with as a small business owner is “SBDC.”
 
SBDC stands for Small Business Development Center. SBDCs provide a wide assortment of technical assistance and resources to small businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs. The primary focus of SBDCs? To foster local and regional economic development through job creation and retention. How does it happen? Through SBDCs’ support of business growth, sustainability, and the enhanced creation of new business entities.
 
So what exactly is available to your business?
 
Marketing AvenueSBDCs offer no-cost, one-on-one, long-term professional business advising, low-cost training, and other specialized services. The SBDC program is one of our nation’s largest small business assistance programs within the federal government, made up of a unique mix of SBA federal funds, state and local governments, and private sector resources. SBDCs are often hosted by leading universities and state economic development agencies, and are funded in part through a partnership with the Small Business Administration.
 
SBDCs serve all populations and many types of business owners, including women, minorities, and veterans—including reservists, active duty, disabled personnel, and those returning from deployment. They also assist personnel with disabilities, youth and encore entrepreneurs, and individuals in low- and moderate-income urban and rural areas. Your local SBDC can connect you with professional business advisors who can help your business navigate:
 
• Business plan development
• Manufacturing
• Financial packaging and lending
• Importing and Exporting
• Disaster recovery
• Procurement and contracting
• Market research
• Healthcare information
 
The best part? SBDCs frequently modify their available services based on client needs, local business trends, and individual business requirements. The centers constantly work to adjust services offered to meet the evolving needs of the hundreds of small businesses in the local community that a particular center serves. 
 
SBDCs can help you realize the dream of business ownership or help your existing businesses remain competitive in a complex, ever-changing global marketplace—and assistance is available virtually anywhere. To find your local SBDC, check out this link.  For additional local assistance resources, you can enter your zip code or click on the map on this page to connect with your local SBA district office and other resources in your area.

Sarah Field is an author and moderator for the the SBA.gov community. She shares useful information for your entrepreneurial endeavors and helps point you in the right direction to find other resources for your small business needs.

 

Source:US SBA


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